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Nurses, make continuing education part of your routine

Learning, growth and development do not end upon graduation from nursing school.

Continuing education plays a crucial role for nurses, and our digital edition Learn About Trends in Continuing Education offers the latest information to keep you on track.

Find out more about important topics related to continuing education, such as which states require CEs and why interprofessional education matters.Continuing education

“As providers of interprofessional CE, we occasionally still have to educate consumers about why interprofessional courses are good for professional practice and patient outcomes,” wrote Robert G. Hess Jr., PhD, RN, FAAN. “But unorthodox trends can become standards of practice. This is why many progressive nursing schools have committed to interprofessional education by having nursing students study side by side with students of medicine, physical therapy, social work and other healthcare disciplines.”

Learn how many CE topics often come from current headlines and help nurses prepare for what they might encounter at the bedside.

Writer Heather Stringer examines how the opioid epidemic, human trafficking and medical and recreational use of marijuana are transforming CE content.

“With the changing laws in this country, cannabis is no longer simply something interesting for nurses to learn about,” Carey Clark, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, an associate professor of nursing at the University of Maine at Augusta, said in the article. “It is now something nurses need to know about. Patients are using medicinal cannabis, and we need to educate them about how they can best use it.”

The edition also features an introduction to a cannabis webinar by Clark to help nurses better understand this trend and what they can expect as states continue to update restrictions on marijuana.

Take your continuing education to the next level

Give your career a boost with tips from Maria Morales, MSN, RN, CPAN, on meeting CE requirements. Nurses should plan to take at least one CE activity a month and take advantage of free CE opportunities, many of which are offered monthly, so check back often.

Regularly taking CE courses not only keeps your career knowledge up to date, it puts you on the path to lifelong learning, a critical component of being a nurse.

Eileen P. Williamson, MSN, RN, explores this topic in “Lifelong learning is a timeless pursuit.”

“Continuing nursing education can be a big part of our lifelong learning,” Williamson wrote. “There are countless ways we can access it to strengthen our expertise and enhance our professionalism. As nurses, it is something we cannot and should not allow ourselves to do without. Our profession keeps growing and changing and so must we.”

Staying up to date on certifications also is essential in nursing and can lead to more money and great career satisfaction.

In “Things are looking up for certified nurses,” read why certified nurses earn more.

Author Karen Schmidt, RN, also looks at certification and how the number of certified nurses are increasing in “New nursing certifications poise practice for growth.”

The edition also covers important topics such as simulation, hybrid educational formats and features an interview with Donna Meyer, MSN, RN, ANEF, FAAN, CEO of the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing.

Meyer recently was appointed to the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice.

Readers also can take our most popular CEs and read advice from nurse legal expert Nancy J. Brent, MS, JD, RN on why its important to maintain good CE requirements to stay in good standing with your board of nursing.

Read Learn About Trends in Continuing Education and discover how lifelong learning can transform your career!

continuing education

By | 2018-12-03T22:38:26+00:00 December 4th, 2018|Categories: Nursing education|0 Comments

About the Author:

Heather Cygan
Heather Cygan is senior director of content and creative strategy for the advertising solutions division of Nurse.com. She has been developing healthcare content for more than 10 years and has a bachelors of arts degree in journalism from Eastern Illinois University. Connect with and follow her on LinkedIn.

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