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Hospitals, health systems make strong showing on ‘Best Employers’ list

When it comes to the nation’s top employers, several hospitals in multiple states rank high, according to a recent Forbes magazine report.

Twenty-five hospitals and health systems throughout the country made the magazine’s list of America’s Best Employers in 2018, a Becker’s Hospital Review news release stated. The list included Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine and Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic. Hospitals in Indiana, Illinois, Texas, California, Utah, New York and Florida also made the list.

This is good news for nurses, who, according to a recent Nurse.com salary survey, placed high importance on salary, benefits and advancement opportunities. Nearly half — 49% of the more than 4,500 qualified RN respondents from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico — said they are considering changing employers.

Luckily for job seekers, it’s an employee’s market. The unemployment rate is at 4.1% according to the Forbes report, with Americans experiencing the tightest job market in 17 years.

“There are more opportunities than ever for nurses right now,” Mary Jane Randazzo, MSN, RN, a nurse recruiter at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia, said in a recent Nurse.com article. “Hospitals are creating roles for nurses in areas such as transplant coordination, urgent care, ambulatory care, clinical documentation and care coordination.”

Employees’ recommendations are tallied

Forbes partnered with market research company Statista to identify companies liked best by employees, the Becker’s Hospital Review news release said. Rankings were divided into two lists —companies with more than 5,000 U.S. employees and midsize organizations with 1,000 to 5,000 U.S. employees.

Data included 30,000 American employees working for businesses with at least 1,000 employees on the list, according to Becker’s. Respondents were asked to assign a number from a scale of one to 10 on how likely they would be to recommend their employer to others.

“We are deeply committed to recruiting the most talented people, training the next generation of healthcare providers, and operating excellent facilities that support patient-centered care,” Ralph W. Muller, CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System said in a Penn Medicine news release. “These efforts come together each day to allow our staff to succeed in their careers at Penn Medicine.”

The Forbes ranking placed Peoria, Ill.-based OSF HealthCare at 46 out of 500 large companies, making it the highest ranked company in the state to receive the distinction, according to the Rockford (Ill.) Register Star. The health system is owned and operated by The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis and employs nearly 21,000 people in 126 locations, including 13 hospitals in Illinois and Michigan.

“Our mission to serve with the greatest care and love is really incorporated into everything we do from the moment we hire you throughout your employment,” Saint Anthony President Paula Carynski told the newspaper. “It really translates into the passion our employees have with our mission and how connected they are with it.”

The 25 hospitals and health systems named among “America’s Best Employers” for 2018 by Forbes include:

  1. Penn Medicine
  1. Mayo Clinic
  1. MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston)
  1. University of Utah Health Care (Salt Lake City)
  1. OSF HealthCare (Peoria, Ill.)
  1. New Hanover Regional Medical Center (Wilmington, N.C.)
  1. University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics (Iowa City)
  1. UCSF Medical Center (San Francisco)
  1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (New York City)
  1. NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (New York City)
  1. HonorHealth (Scottsdale, Ariz.)
  1. Legacy Health (Portland, Ore.)
  1. University of Maryland Medical Center (Baltimore)
  1. Parkview Health (Fort Wayne, Ind.)
  1. Norton Healthcare (Louisville)
  1. Nationwide Children’s Hospital (Columbus, Ohio)
  1. Texas Health Resources (Arlington)
  1. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  1. MUSC Health (Charleston, S.C.)
  1. UC Davis Health System (Sacramento, Calif.)
  1. Michigan Medicine (Ann Arbor)
  1. Northwestern Medicine (Chicago)
  1. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  1. Sentara Healthcare (Norfolk, Va.)
  1. Tampa (Fla.) General Hospital

 


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By | 2018-06-22T19:12:59+00:00 June 22nd, 2018|Categories: Nursing careers and jobs, Nursing news|3 Comments

About the Author:

Sallie Jimenez
Sallie Jimenez is content manager for healthcare for Nurse.com published by OnCourse Learning. She develops and edits content for the Nurse.com blog, which covers industry news and trends in the nursing profession and healthcare. She also develops content for the Nurse.com Digital Editions. She has more than 22 years of healthcare journalism, content marketing and editing experience.

3 Comments

  1. Ann July 2, 2018 at 2:07 am - Reply

    “There are more opportunities than ever for nurses right now,” Mary Jane Randazzo, MSN, RN, a nurse recruiter at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia, said in a recent Nurse.com article. “Hospitals are creating roles for nurses in areas such as transplant coordination, urgent care, ambulatory care, clinical documentation and care coordination.”

    This is great news for RNs in the states where new roles are being created. If I had the means to relocate, I would.
    A large hospital organization in Colorado, has made significant staffing changes/layoffs during the past 28 months, including replacement of RNs with MAs in their Urgent Care clinics.
    Not all nurses want to work as a “floor nurse” due to other passions in the nursing field and most of us RNs are “older” and would love to use our skills in a less physically demanding environment. Unfortunately, the open positions for RNs are mostly “floor nurses”.

  2. Garnetta Johnson July 4, 2018 at 12:27 am - Reply

    I woul like to know of a online school i am a Lpn

  3. Robbin Fordeh July 9, 2018 at 9:43 am - Reply

    very informative post, I am looking for home care nursing courses, I would like to specialize in health care and everydayhealth.

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