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Do I need to hire an attorney to see about the return of my license at the completion of my probation? Are all restrictions automatically removed?

Question:

Dear Nancy,

I was placed on three years of probation and completed all board requirements. I was told my license will show up on the board website as “removal of restrictions.” Are all restrictions automatically removed? Do I need to hire an attorney to see about the return of my license at the completion of
my probation?

Michela

Dear Nancy replies:

Dear Michela,

You should be commended for successfully completing all of your restrictions during the time your license was on probation. Many times nurses are not able to fulfill all of their restrictions, which results in further problems with their license.

You will need to contact a nurse attorney or other attorney in your state to obtain specific answers to the questions you raise. Each state board of nursing’s rules and procedures may be different when a license is placed on probation and the probation is completed. For example, some boards of nursing don’t require a petition to be filed to remove the probationary status from a license while others do. Your statement that the board’s website will state “removal of restrictions” sounds like there may not be a requirement to petition the board for a removal of the probationary status, but this is best reviewed by an attorney in your state after he reviews the initial order from the board placing the license on probation.

Your comment about getting your license back is a bit confusing. In most states, a license is not “taken” by a board when the nurse licensee is placed on probation. Rather, the discipline is listed on the board’s website, which sounds like what happened to you, and/or the actual license in the possession of the nurse may be stamped or marked “probation.” Again, your attorney can best advise you of what you need to do if indeed your license is not now in your possession and your probation has been successfully completed.

Cordially,
Nancy

By | 2015-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 February 27th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Nursing careers and jobs|0 Comments

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