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Nurse entrepreneur series: Q&A with founder of Healthy Feet: RN Foot Care Services

Welcome to our Nurse Entrepreneur Series! Meet Sara Genta, RN, BSN, CFCN, owner of Healthy Feet: RN Foot Care Services. Sara provides foot care services in the Portland, Ore., area to individuals who are unable to care for their own feet due to medical reasons, lack of mobility, etc.

Sara shares her experience as a foot care nurse in this Q&A.

Q. How long have you been a nurse? What’s your nursing background/experience?

A. Nursing is not my first career. I started out with a bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy and became a language arts teacher in a middle school. After staying home to raise three children, I divorced when my youngest was 5. Only then did I go back to school, in my 40s, to earn my BSN. I realized I would not have the stamina to work 12-hour night shifts as a new grad. I was drawn to community healthcare, and working with seniors was a natural fit. Immediately out of nursing school, I started working in home care at a retirement community and provided foot care at their ambulatory clinic. I only graduated from nursing school in 2011.

Q. What was the impetus for creating Healthy Feet? What services do you provide?

A. I decided to start my own business, Healthy Feet: RN Foot Care Services, so I could control my own work hours and make a better salary. Foot care is one of the few areas where a registered nurse can be self-employed. I provide foot care, much like a podiatrist might, to those who cannot or should not take care of their own feet. Diabetics, dexterity- and vision-challenged clients, and those who are on blood thinners, are my target group. I host clinics at community centers, a downtown church, retirement communities and do some home visits.

Q. Can you share any tips or resources for nurses who are interested in becoming a foot care nurse?

A. Certification in foot care through the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing Certification Board adds professional legitimacy to my practice. I recommend this extra training and professional networking if you are interested in becoming a foot care RN. Another resource is The American Foot Care Nurses Association. Continuing to stay abreast of the latest evidence-based practice in the field is encouraged. Of course, an entrepreneurial desire to run one’s own business is necessary.

Q. What are the best things about being a nurse entrepreneur?

A. I like the scheduling flexibility that self-employment allows. Additionally, executing a new idea takes the approval of just one person!

Q. What are the greatest challenges?

A. Challenges in my work include loss of income due to sickness or missed appointments (I cannot bill insurance but, then again, I do not have to deal with that paperwork) and a lack of daily collegial interaction. I also pay for my own health insurance. Another challenge comes with my desire to be continually learning, and this is heavily repetitive skill-based work. On the other hand, when I clock out at the end if the day, I can easily switch off for some downtime from work.

Q. Looking back, as you started your business, what do you wish you had known? What advice would you give others?

A. Overall, I am pleased with my decision to start my business. I knew I wouldn’t become a 30-year nurse because I started this path later in life, but my hourly rate is almost commensurate with a nurse with that much experience. If you are interested in going into foot care — even as a segue to retirement — I suggest shadowing with a current foot care nurse and then taking a class to learn the particular skills involved. Taking a small business class also might be useful.

Thank you, Sara! Any other foot care nurses out there? Anyone who thinks this kind of nurse entrepreneur venture might be for them?

By | 2015-02-02T05:00:26+00:00 February 2nd, 2015|Categories: Archived|7 Comments

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  1. Avatar
    Trisha Davidson RN November 16, 2016 at 3:50 pm - Reply

    I’ve been working part time as CFCN in MA for almost 2 years. Do you know if there are foot mds who gave CFCNs on staff?
    Any tips on how to approach that!

  2. Avatar
    Nicole April 5, 2017 at 1:52 am - Reply

    I am an lpn that is foot care certified in Michigan. Can I start my own business?

  3. Avatar
    Nikko Farmer August 11, 2017 at 2:01 pm - Reply

    how do you get paid?

  4. Avatar
    Pleshette Grant September 18, 2017 at 12:16 pm - Reply

    Thanks for the information

  5. Avatar
    Thomas Palmer July 16, 2018 at 7:17 am - Reply

    You may wish to contact podiatrist office and see if there is an opportunity to be employed in their office. We have been contemplating hiring a foot care nurse for some time.

  6. Avatar
    JoDi Cooper December 10, 2019 at 9:19 am - Reply

    I am intrested and talking with you or someone that represents you I am in the Midwest I am a manicure pedicure licensed and I go to individual homes and senior facilities and do in home pedicure foot care I used to work for a podiatrist that’s how I got into it
    I am enquiring because I am in the process of thinking about retiring and selling my business don’t know if you’re intrested in coming to the Midwest it would really be great and it’s much needed please let me know or email text whatever l
    et me know if you’re intrested
    I own a business and I work the business I have no other employees I have about 200 clients and growing
    I have been doing this since 2000

  7. Avatar
    JoDi Cooper December 10, 2019 at 10:02 am - Reply

    I thought I might tell you that I only work 2 or 3 days a week it can be put in to 5 days a week easily just thought I needed to tell you that

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