You are here:-, Nursing careers and jobs-I am awaiting my APRN license and revising my resume. Is there a site where I can view templates or examples of new graduate NP resumes and cover letters?

I am awaiting my APRN license and revising my resume. Is there a site where I can view templates or examples of new graduate NP resumes and cover letters?

Question:

Dear Donna,

After a yearlong journey of locating a preceptor in Houston in order to complete 400 hours of clinical rotation, I made it to the next step of applying for my APRN license in Texas. I have down time while I am waiting for my license. In preparation for a job search, I revised both my resume and cover letter. It was a draining task because the resume has to be one of a new graduate Adult NP. I have a couple questions concerning this. Is it okay to put “looking for a job as a new graduate NP, “on both the resume and cover letter? Also, I need to know the most pertinent information to list. Is there a site you recommend where I can view templates or examples of new graduate NP resumes and cover letters? Any other advice you can give me at this stage would be greatly appreciated.

New NP

Dear Donna replies:

Dear New NP,

Regarding your first question above, that statement sounds like something one might use as an objective on a resume. I don’t recommend using an objective on a resume at all. Instead, use a “Summary” which is a marketing statement that gives an overview of your background along with some strong and relevant personal traits. For example: “Advanced Practice RN with over 30 years of nursing experience in varied settings, passionate about healthcare with strong communication and leadership skills,” has a great sense of humor and is committed to continuing education.” Do you see how much better that sounds and why that would be more effective to get attention and generate interest than “looking for a job as a new graduate NP”?

I also wouldn’t make that statement in a cover letter either. In a cover letter you should be addressing why specifically you want to work where it is that you are applying, not simply that you are “looking for a job” anywhere at all. That is a very generic and ineffective approach.

Also, you make it sound in your post that you feel like you are starting all over again or changing careers and completely recreating your resume. This is not necessary. You are presumably an experienced RN who has recently elevated her credentials. You are expanding and enhancing your practice and your resume, not giving it a complete overhaul unless it needed one.

Please read, “New credentials, new role” (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/New-Credentials) for additional tips on marketing yourself as a new APRN. You will find extensive and detailed information about creating a nursing resume and cover letter in any situation plus a lot more self-marketing tips in “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses” (http://ce.nurse.com/course/7250/).

Also, it is important for you to join and get active in the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (http://www.aanp.org/). Networking is a very effective way to find a job. However, you need to be part of the larger APRN community for support, advice and practice information. When there is something you want to do, you have to start rubbing elbows with those already successfully doing it.

Best wishes,
Donna

By | 2014-10-03T00:00:00-04:00 October 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Nursing careers and jobs|0 Comments

About the Author:

Avatar

Leave A Comment