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Elizabeth Seton Pediatric Center announces facility expansion

Elizabeth Seton Pediatric Center, Yonkers, N.Y., has announced plans for a three-story expansion project that will cost approximately $22 million and accommodate 32 additional medically complex children who are dependent on ventilators.

The addition will enable Elizabeth Seton to serve 50 ventilator-dependent children and will bring the number of children served by the pediatric center to 169, according to a news release. In addition, the John A. Coleman School, which serves the residents of the center, will add two classrooms.

Elizabeth Seton is a specialty pediatric nursing facility that has served some of New York State’s most medically complex children for the past 26 years. Since creating a long-term ventilator care program in 2006, the center has established a reputation for providing care for children with significant respiratory needs, according to the release.

In early 2006, Elizabeth Seton was asked by the New York State Department of Health to consider offering in-state long-term care for ventilator-dependent children.
“Before our long-term ventilator care program began, families of ventilator-dependent children faced the dilemma of having to relocate their child out of state and far from their loved ones,” Elizabeth Seton CEO Patricia Tursi said in the release. “We just couldn’t let that happen, and we knew we needed to repatriate these children and reunite them with their families.”

In August of 2006, the center opened a specialized, long-term program that accommodated four ventilator-dependent children. The count increased to eight children by the end of 2009. When the center relocated from Manhattan to its present home in 2012, it increased the number of ventilator-dependent children it could serve to 18.

The center has a waiting list of almost 30 children and families seeking admission.

“The program here is unmatched,” Gordon Hutcheon, MD, the center’s chief medical officer, said in the release. “With the expertise of our interdisciplinary staff of physicians, nurses, therapists, educators and more, our ventilator-dependent children do everything a child who is not on a ventilator does. They attend school, participate in activities and even go on trips. These children are not bound to their rooms and we take pride in that.”

By | 2014-08-22T00:00:00-04:00 August 22nd, 2014|Categories: New York/New Jersey Metro, Regional|0 Comments

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