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Nurse.com coverage focuses on cardiac care issues

I hope you were “seeing red” last week because your nursing colleagues and the other women in your life were wearing red in recognition of National Wear Red Day. For more than 10 years, the day has been set aside by the American Heart Association to raise awareness about the fight against heart disease in women. Current statistics reveal heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the U.S., and that it causes more deaths in women than all forms of cancer combined. These statistics should be of concern to all nurses who play key roles in preventing heart disease through nursing research, education and patient care.

Each year in February, Nurse.com focuses on matters of the heart, and this year we have a number of things to share with you. In this issue we examine cardiac arrest and CPR and how patient survival rates following arrest are affected by the quality of the CPR patients receive.

The article includes information on how variables such as patient location and time of day can affect survival rates. It also provides current data regarding higher-quality CPR techniques and the effect these can have on patient outcomes. It presents research findings about the quality of resuscitation that is performed before and during hospitalization, and how even healthcare professionals don’t always carry out CPR effectively.

In addition, it looks at nurses’ professional responsibility to know how to administer optimal CPR, and discusses a truth we all accept — that resuscitation is a major patient safety issue and one of the most important things we are called upon to do.

On Nurse.com in late February we’ll look at a recent study on door-to-balloon times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, which revealed a surprisingly low correlation between faster arrivals in the cath lab and decreased mortality rates. We interview staff and professional experts, and examine some reasons why earlier treatment doesn’t always mean lives saved. We also present other strategies and resources hospitals are instituting to improve mortality rates in these patients.

We hope you will enjoy these and our other February stories, both in print and online, and that the information they provide will add value to your practice. Nurse.com wants to be your No. 1 source for nursing news and information, and provide that information on as many platforms as possible. We invite you to try our new app. To access it, just visit Nurse.com/App or download the app directly from iTunes, Amazon.com (for Kindle) or Google Play. This new app also features our Nurse.com Trending Now in #Nursing series, which launched in January.

Let us know what you think by email and through our social media platforms. We value your feedback. Share this special February heart month issue in its print and digital versions with your colleagues and patients, and pass it along to all the women in your life — because heart disease matters. And so do the many hearts you care for and care about as a nurse.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

By | 2014-02-10T00:00:00-05:00 February 10th, 2014|Categories: Nurses stories, Your Stories|0 Comments

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