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New York Nurses Share Their New Year’s Plans

Nurses share what their personal and institutional patient care plans are for 2011, and how those goals will affect patient care. From obtaining new certifications to taking the time to listen to and interact with those under their care, nurses focus on the bedside to take their practice to a whole new level. For more nurses’ resolutions, visit www.Nurse.com and click on the Regions tab to read 2011 care plans from nurses nationwide.

Adrienne Suggs-Rayster, RN, MA, care transitions manager, CMO, The Care Management Company, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, N.Y.

Adrienne Suggs-Rayster, RN

My New Year’s resolution is to proactively manage a selected patient population by empowering them toward self-care management. I will achieve this by educating patients on medication management, red flag symptoms requiring consultation with the physician and ensuring that patients have medical and specialty follow-up appointments.

In my new role as care transitions manager, I will assess, plan, intervene and evaluate the patient’s transitional care experience from the inpatient setting to the home environment. As an integral member of the Care Management Team, I promote principals of complex disease management, and facilitating efficient patient navigation in the transitional process. Our transitional care model is a hybrid of the multiple programs in the evidence-based literature. This model is in alignment with the changes proposed for the future of healthcare reform.

In this role, there is strong collaboration with the multidisciplinary healthcare team, particularly the patient’s primary healthcare provider and medical management programs. Through the implementation of this new care transitions program, we will decrease patient readmissions to the hospital, improve patient clinical outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction.

My New Year’s resolution is to proactively manage a selected patient population by empowering them toward self-care management. I will achieve this by educating patients on medication management, red flag symptoms requiring consultation with the physician and ensuring that patients have medical and specialty follow-up appointments.

In my new role as care transitions manager, I will assess, plan, intervene and evaluate the patient’s transitional care experience from the inpatient setting to the home environment. As an integral member of the Care Management Team, I promote principals of complex disease management, and facilitating efficient patient navigation in the transitional process. Our transitional care model is a hybrid of the multiple programs in the evidence-based literature. This model is in alignment with the changes proposed for the future of healthcare reform.

In this role, there is strong collaboration with the multidisciplinary healthcare team, particularly the patient’s primary healthcare provider and medical management programs. Through the implementation of this new care transitions program, we will decrease patient readmissions to the hospital, improve patient clinical outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction.

Barbara Ravida, RNC, MSN, ANP-BC, CPCU team leader, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, N.Y.

Barbara Ravida, RNC

I’m a big promoter of advanced degrees and advanced nursing to my coworkers and nursing students at Hunter College, and I resolve every year to continue to do that. I would love to see a nationwide expansion of the scope of practice for nurse practitioners in all clinical areas, including equal privileges across all of the states.

One of the major issues facing consumers is finding affordable, accessible healthcare. Too often people seek care in the ED or not at all until their symptoms are unmanageable, both of which place an enormous strain on our resources. Utilizing the APN in a broader role in the delivery of care would help alleviate this problem.

NPs are academically and intellectually prepared to provide care to the acutely and chronically ill. They also are prepared to provide preventive care, which would decrease the burden of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and hypertension. There is a nationwide shortage of general practitioners in the medical field, and the APN could fulfill that role with expertise.

The nation’s healthcare crisis is not improving and recent signs point to it only getting worse. The NP has been recognized as a professional that can render necessary care in both the rural and urban setting, so why not invest in the health of our nation with practitioners that are ready, willing and able? Using the APN to, so to speak, “fill the gaps” would result in overall better healthcare for our population and decrease the economic strain of not being able to provide equitable care for all.

Maureen Altieri, RN, MS, Magnet coordinator, Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, N.Y.

Maureen Altieri, RN

As a Magnet-designated organization, my resolutions involve the healthcare at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center aligned with the Magnet vision that we “will lead the reformation of healthcare, the discipline of nursing, and care of the patient, family and community.”

To lead and manage the change that is upon us, we need to constantly examine the best possible ways to deliver quality care. As professional nurses, it is our responsibility to put into place substantial structure and processes that will improve patient outcomes. This will be achieved by incorporating the revised professional practice model and care delivery system into our daily nursing practice, engaging all disciplines in our nighttime bundle to provide a more restful, healing environment for our patients, and working toward improving nurse-sensitive indicators by translating the best evidence in literature into our professional nursing practice.

Linda Perez, RN, MS, NP, administrative director, Department of Neurosciences, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn

Linda Perez, RN

I actually have two. I’d love to see real parity for mental illness and destigmatization of those who suffer from it. Too many people walk around with problems and are ashamed to get help because of the stigma that society imposes. It’s not a character flaw or weakness. People are not ashamed to say they have diabetes or other illnesses.

Second, we’re all about advanced practice nurses now. I’m one myself. All of that is good, but let’s not forgot the heart and soul of nursing. Too many nurse practitioners practice medicine. Doctors still look at us as physician extenders. Advanced practice is good, but let’s make sure we’re doing right by those people who are right out there giving direct care.

I would love to see staff nurses unite and show how important they are. We don’t want them to lose their autonomy. When people think “nurse,” that’s who they are thinking about. We need to make sure the profession is paying enough attention to them, as well.

Ava Ramirez-dela Cruz, RN-BC, senior staff nurse, orthopedics, White Plains (N.Y.) Hospital Center

Ava Ramirez-dela Cruz, RN-BC

My goals for the new year are to continue to provide excellent care by adhering to hourly rounding protocols and to deliver competent and compassionate care without losing my passion for the profession.

What I have learned from my patients throughout the years as I have matured professionally is that we have to be able to place ourselves in their situation and understand that human touch is more healing than machines and medications. It is essential to focus attention on what patients are sharing with us and to treat them with compassion and respect.

We alleviate patients’ anxieties and gain their trust when we take the extra time to explain goals, treatments and medications for the day and really hear their concerns. I’ve found that when my patients can trust my competence and feel my concern through my words and actions, they are more likely to cooperate with their plan of care.

Implementing hourly rounding provides my patients with a sense of security that they are being cared for in the best possible way, increasing overall patient outcomes and patient and staff satisfaction.

Lieyin Pai, RN, staff nurse, yellow unit (children ages 1 to 12), Blythedale Children’s Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y.

Lieyin Pai, RN

In 2011, I plan on enrolling in a certified pediatric nurse review course and taking the pediatric certification examination. I also hope to maintain effective and open communication with my patients and through that process, I will resolve all patient concerns and problems in a timely manner.

Over the past five years, I have realized that continuing education is critical for all nurses. Constant review as well as learning new concepts improves patient care, and through the process of becoming a certified pediatric nurse, I will be able to improve my patient care.

Patients are the best teachers. I have learned so much from my patients and their caretakers in the past five years, and I know I will continue to learn from them in 2011. It is critical to listen to what patients have to say and understand their routines and special cultural needs. It might be something as easy as asking a patient when he or she would like to take a bath. Mutual communication is the bridge between two sides of a river. In the beginning months of my nursing career, I struggled to complete my nursing tasks. Gradually, my patients taught me that in spending time and listening to them, I gave them the care they really needed.

By | 2020-04-15T13:10:38-04:00 January 10th, 2011|Categories: New York/New Jersey Metro, Regional|0 Comments

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