You are here:----CentraState Healthcare System Opens New Critical Care Unit

CentraState Healthcare System Opens New Critical Care Unit

FREEHOLD, N.J. — On Sept. 17, Centrastate Healthcare System opened a 26-bed CCU with 16 beds designated for critical care and 10 for step-down. “We wanted to update our CCU, and we have a booming ED, so we needed to expand to accommodate our critical care patients,” says Linda Geisler, RN, MNEd, NEA-BC, vice president of patient care services at CentraState.

Nursing staff and administration were directly involved in the design and acquisition of equipment. They educated themselves with site visits to other facilities and experimented with a mock room.

From left, Rohini Mahase, RN, case manager; Kathy Poznanski, RN, staff nurse and Practice Council representative; Melanie Baccoli, RN, nurse educator; and Ellen Ciacciarelli, RN, assistant nurse manager, welcomed staff throughout the hospital, board members, and the community to see the new unit.

Each private room is equipped with a boom, which holds virtually every piece of equipment essential for patient care. Because the boom moves 360 degrees, patients can go to the bathroom with relative ease and RNs can move the boom to accommodate the patient and patient care. The rooms also have CABs for bedside charting and medication administration, and e-glass, not curtains, are in place to offer visibility and privacy as needed.

“Because everything is right at the pod, nurses don’t have to leave the bedside. Although our unit secretaries have their own stations, they do hourly rounding to the nurses,” says Melanie Baccoli, RN, MSN, CCRN, nurse educator.

From left, Rohini Mahase, RN, case manager; Kathy Poznanski, RN, staff nurse and Practice Council representative; Ellen Ciacciarelli, RN, assistant nurse manager; Melanie Baccoli, RN, nurse educator; Annie Shelton, RN, nurse manager; Linda Geisler, RN, vice president of patient care services; and Cathy Jauzekovich, RN, assistant vice president of nursing

Immediately outside the room are two computers, one for the RN and one for the MD and other professionals, and a locked box for the patient’s medications, which are delivered directly to the pod. In addition, there is a general monitor that allows the RN staff to monitor patients throughout the entire unit.

“No decision was treated lightly. We chose soothing colors and landscape pictures for the walls, and with the help of our practice council, we instituted extended visiting hours and consistent colors for staff uniforms,” says Annie Shelton, RN, BS, CCRN, nurse manager of the unit for seven years. “We tried to think about as many of the details as possible ahead of time, such as space accommodations for stretchers, X-ray machines, and crash carts, sleeper chairs for family members, and door openings that accommodate bariatric chairs,” Shelton adds.

By | 2020-04-15T14:56:12-04:00 October 5th, 2009|Categories: New York/New Jersey Metro, Regional|0 Comments

About the Author:

Avatar

Leave A Comment