Nomination Samples

Advancing and Leading the Profession Sample | Clinical Care Sample | Community Service Sample | Management Sample | Mentoring Sample | Teaching Sample

Sample Nomination - Advancing and Leading the Profession Category

What is the Nominee’s Professional Role?
Chief Nursing Officer, Associate Executive Director at a ______bed quaternary academic medical center.

How do you know the nominee?
Professor at the School of Nursing of a large urban university

Why Should This Nominee Win?
This nominee is a positive role model and an inspiring representative on nursing in settings where often nurses are not present. She is equally devoted to represent nurses achievements within the nursing community as she is to represent the contributions of nursing research and practice in multi-professional and multi-disciplinary settings. She is devoted to teaching and to translating science into clinical practice and policy, navigating easily from the classroom to the board room. She is a leader among leaders, with a grace and generosity rarely seen in someone with her long list of achievements. Her clinic expertise, recognized nationally and internationally, addresses quality of life in patients with lung cance r and the closely related topic of tobacco control. She developed programs of research in areas that at the time where not being prioritized by nurses or the healthcare system. For example, she was one of the first nurses to see the importance of the growing epidemic of lung cancer among women, of studying quality of life among cancer survivors, and the implications for nursing practice. She developed the first national program to both help nurses become more involved in helping their patients quit smoking as well as help nurses themselves quit. She advocated for funding to help nurses quit while providing them with the tools and skills to help their patients. The nominee received her BS from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Nursing at a time when minimum attention was paid to the health issues related to tobacco use and the growing rates of lung cancer among women. After a few years of working in medical-surgical nursing, with a growing interest in oncology, she completed her MS at UCLA, where her interest on the quality of life of terminally ill patients was established and20her awareness of the issues associated with smoking growing. After several years of teaching she received a Doctor of Nursing Science from the University of California, San Francisco. She is a stronger supporter of nurses pursuing advanced degrees and the value of nursing research to inform nursing practice and health policy. In addition to serving as committee member for several master and doctoral students, she tirelessly offers her expertise participating, over the years, in several professional and voluntary association boards, as well as committees in the school of nursing where she works, at the university and at national and international organizations. The nominee perceives the additional demands this committee and board involvement places on her time as both a duty to provide services as and as an opportunity to provide a nursing perspective on these various forums. She is a certified clinical nurse specialist and advanced oncology certified nurse as well s a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She has received several awards recognizing her contributions, most recent ly the 2009 Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Distinguished Researcher award, the 2009 UCSF Helen Nahm Research Lecture, the Distinguished Merit Award from the International Society for Nurses in Cancer Care, the ONS award for the excellence of her contributions to the oncology nursing literature, and a Light Award from a chapter of the National Womens Political Caucus for her leadership in womens issues related to tobacco. Despite her impressive achievements, the nominee has not rested on her laurels and continues to demonstrate leadership in moving the nursing agenda forward, engaging recently in innovative research to assess the best strategies to translate evidence-based smoking cessation into nursing practice, exploring the use of technology (website and webinar) as a continuing education tool.Her scholarship addresses the critical public health issues of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death, and tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. A pioneer in oncology nursing education, she has taught in the graduate oncology nursing specialty program at a large university for over 30 years, and co-authored one of the first modern texts books in oncology nursing, a recipient of an AJN Book of the Year award, in 1981.But what really sets her apart is her ability to remain accessible to colleagues and her willingness to share her expertise and help others develop their full potential in advancing their nursing career. She opened new paths for nurses but she doesnt look back to see if anyone is following, she actively assists younger nurses and investigators in using the path she created to create their own, always perceiving and valuing each individual nurses achievement is an advancement for nursing as a profession.

What Has This Nominee Contributed to Nursing?
The nominees scholarship includes over 100 peer-reviewed publications, over 50 book chapters, monographs or commentaries, and 10 policies/position statements. Highlights of her work include one of the first papers on the Quality of Life (QOL) of long-term lung cancer survivors and one of the first on the QOL issues faced by women living with lung cancer. Her work now focuses on QOL during recovery from lung cancer surgery. An important aspect of these studies was the description of the prevalence of smoking and the impact on symptoms. She was one of the first researchers to identify co-occurring clusters of symptoms among people cancer. Through her involvement in the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), she helped shape the research agenda keeping care o f patients with lung cancer and tobacco control and at the forefront.She received support for her scholarship from a variety of funders including the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the ACS, the ONS, the UC Tobacco-related Disease Research program, and the UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center, among others. She is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Nursing, and Nursing Research.

Is There Anything Else the Judges Should Know?
The nominee is an internationally recognized expert in quality of life and lung cancer, and, in the area of tobacco control, she has provided national and international nursing leadership. As a result of her work identifying smoking among nurses as a barrier to the provision of tobacco dependence treatment to patients as well as increasing health risks to nurses, smoking among nurses is now a primary focus of her research. She led the first-ever national program helped nurses quit smoking and promoted nursing involvement in tobacco control. She and her20colleagues created the award winning website www.tobaccofreenurses.org. TFN was selected as an exemplar by the World Health Organization for The Role of Health Professionals in Tobacco Control and is being used as a model to for a global network for nurses in tobacco control at WHO. Of note, the nominee, with her colleagues, led a secondary analyses of 27-year trends in smoking of participants in the Nurses Health Study, the longest running study of womens health in the world, and highlighted the devastating impact of smoking on the profession, receiving international attention. This was one of the very few nurse-led analyses of the NHS data. Her current research includes a web-based educational clinical trial to improve nursing delivery of smoking cessation interventions among nurses in 30 hospitals in 3 states. Using her scholarship as a platform, she has collaborated with nursing organizations to expand nursing policies in tobacco control.She is a grant reviewer for several organizations, including the National Cancer Institute, and professional journals. She is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Nursing Research, Annual Review of Nursing Research, Cancer Nursing.She is a leader in nursing by being more than an exemplar professional: she is a superb human being: good friend, steady supporter, generous mentor. T here are no doubts that nursing profession has arrived at a better place in the past 3 decades because of the efforts of the nominee and will continue to advance under her enthusiastic scholarship and leadership.

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Sample Nomination - Clinical Care Category

Professional Role:
The nominee is a Nurse Practitioner who leads a multidisciplinary team that provides care for general medical patients with significant psycho-social issues that add challenge and complexity to the provision of care and to their long-term care plan.

How do you know the nominee?
I am an associate chief nurse at a 900-bed, major academic medical center, providing support and direction for nursing and patient care in Medicine, Cardiac and Emergency Services. That scope encompasses approximately 1,500 FTEs and 21 nursing directors as direct reports. The nominee is one of my direct reports.

Why should this person win?
This nominee is an extraordinary person and clinician who epitomizes nursing at its best. She is highly skilled, compassionate, a sound critical thinker, a collaborator, and consistently displays the highest ethical standards. She serves as the ultimate patient advocate.What sets this nominee apart is her advocacy for those most disenfranchised; those caught in the system, the seemingly invisible but ever-present patients who cycle into and out of the healthcare system. The large majority have few, if any, support systems, resources or places to turn for help of any kind. The nominee has a unique ability to see beyond the initial snapshot (one that overwhelms most), to see the person. Then, through enormous effort and innovation, she is able to establish a level of trust and cooperation that facilitates mutually agreed upon and improved outcomes. All of this is done with a level of unassuming confidence and dedication on the part of the nominee. Although consistently understated, the nominee is widely held in the highest regard for her professional practice and collaboration across all disciplines.The impact of her direct clinical care as well as the broader clinical impact she has had though systems innovations are profound. Most notably, four years ago, the hospital began to face growing and serious capacity concerns. One contributing factor was the concentration of long length of stay patients who had generally less acute medical conditions, but complicated psycho-social issues. While this patient population represented only 4 of medicine discharges, they accounted for 27 of total patient days. The nominee proposed creating a multi-disciplinary teamto include a physician, case manager, and social workerthat would specialize in highly customized care approaches for this specific patient population. The team would also require regular and consistent access to a variety of other disciplines, and in particular Psychiatry, Legal, and Patient Financial Services. The goals were to provide early intervention, ensure continuity of care, and develop expertise in the care of psychosocially complex patients. As the nominee proposed, This population of patients would be particularly comforted by seeing the same clinicians each day. This continuity would also allow team members to really know their patients and to begin to sort through the complexity of their particular situations.The team would conduct daily multidisciplinary rounds, facilitate enhanced communication and coordination with the patient, family and caregivers, and offer creative approaches to overcoming barriers; all of which would be critical as more than half of these patients have multiple complex psychosocial issues.As a testimony to the nominees vision, our academic medical center supported the program, which has since proven to be extraordinarily successful. The teams ability to advance the care of this patient population became apparent quickly. The nominee provided a focus, cohesiveness and consistency to the care of these patients, where little had previously existed. Qualitatively, patients, families and the many providers and disciplines involved universally speak to the value of the expertise and the continuity provided through this dedicated team, which is led by the nominee. Quantitatively, length of stay in acute care has been reduced as safe patient transitions to non-acute settings have been more successfully facilitated. Ultimately this has resulted in improved patient care and access to needed and appropriate level care across the continuum.

Contributions to nursing in general:
The nominee is a unique and important role model to novice and seasoned nurses. She serves as a living example of dedication and commitment to true patient advocacy, delivering personalized care to all patients and in all circumstances, and enabling others to do the same. And she serves as an important reminder that patient care is about the people firsttheir whole being, life, lifestyle and life circumstances. This is key to the concept of patient and family centered care that should not be sacrificed, regardless of the pace and demands placed upon the todays healthcare system.She has shared her innovative Team model with colleagues throughout the institution and our multi-hospital, integrated healthcare system. In an effort to address the needs of vulnerable patients throughout the country, she has likewise presented the model at many national meetings, including the Academy of Psychomotor Medicine Annual Meeting, American College of Nurse Practitioners 2008 National Clinical Conference, Academy of Psychomotor Medicine Annual Meeting. Attendees have approached the nominee to learn more about nursings role on the teamparticularly that of her own role as team leaderand have expressed great interest in learning how they might adopt a similar model of care within their own institutions. She has subsequently received requests to consult and/or observe from institutions across the country, including the University of Miami School of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, and the Duke University Medical Center.The nominee is participating in the design of a system wide effort to measure the ongoing impact of this work. And in addition to multiple presentations of both the design and outcomes, locally and nationally, she is preparing to publish and share the model more broadly still. When all is said and done, this nominee has directly improved, if not saved, the lives of countless patients otherwise lost in the healthcare system. She has established at our own institution, a care model that responds to those who need us most. And finally through efforts to share the model with others across the country, she has set the stage for others to do similarly.

What else should the judges know?
While all of the above speaks to the broader picture of the nominees work and its far-reaching impact, it is important to remember that all of the nominees cases are intensely complex, requiring extensive time and resources. And her work and her vision are impacting individual livesthe very complicated lives of the most vulnerable of patients. One typical patient vignette might best bring this to life.The nominees Team recently worked with what for them is a classic referral: A woman in her fifties was admitted to the hospital as a Jane Doe. There was no medical history or information about this patients living situation. Tests revealed that she had suffered a stroke, but the patient herself could provide no details. She was described as homeless, had cognitive deficits, and over the course of a month had been seen by Neurology, the Stroke Service, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology, the Homeless Service, Psychiatry, Nutrition and Food Services, and the Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialist Consult Service. After two months at the hospital, she was medically stable, but with so many details about her life still unknown, putting together an appropriate discharge plan presented a huge challenge. The nominee was called for a Team consult.As the nominee observed, The patients we see often have an array of psycho-social issues that can test the limits of traditional hospital care. In this case, setting up the appropriate supports and services outside of the hospital was critical to this patients overall healthcare plan.Led by the nominee, as members of the Team began to work intensively with the patient, clues about her background began to emerge. She claimed she had held a steady job in a downtown hotel for nearly 20 years. She had kept an apartment, but when her health failed she spent all of her savings, lost her apartment and moved in with a friend until that was no longer an option. She eventually became homeless. With only scant bits of information to go on, and after weeks of investigating, the Team social worker struck gold: She managed to locate the patients former employer.Jane Doe now had a name. From there, the team was able to find their patients medicalrecords and other information that would help them craft a safe discharge plan. They focusedon bringing the many vital pieces togethera daunting task in and of itself. A speech-language pathologist was called in to reassess the patients cognitive ability to help determine the level of support she might need in her new living situation. The nominee worked with the Teams social worker and case manager, and began the arduous task of helping the patient secure funding for her future living situation, including securing a new Social Security card and filling out endless forms and applications. Arrangements were made for Team members to bring the patient to visit several assisted living facilities to allow her a voice in where she would ultimately live. A consult with a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist was requested to develop a behavioral plan with the patients nurses to support them as they helped her continue to make progress and transition from the hospital to a life beyond the walls of the hospital.In the end, the nominee and her Team assumed responsibility for a highly complex case and managed to do for their Jane Doe what they do for so many other patients who, again, might otherwise end up getting lost in the system: They gave their patient back her life.Thank you for your consideration of her nomination for the Nursing Spectrum Excellence Award in Clinical Care.

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Sample Nomination – Community Service Category

What is the nominee’s professional role”?
In Northern Zimbabwe located in a poor, poverty stricken area, there is an active medical care facility, a mission hospital. The person in charge of this hospital or Sister in Charge, has accomplished a remarkable job. She directs all aspects of the hospital, from administrative duties to medical treatment of critically ill patients. Such care included difficult births, emergency surgeries, crocodile bites, burns, reading X rays, and many other medical problems. Hundreds of outpatients has received successful treatments of this sort from her. These patients come from near and far. Some came from as far away as 500 miles as this is the only functioning hospital in Mashonaland west. Many patients traveled over five hours from the capital city of Harare, just to receive the kind of  medical care given at this mission hospital. Most of the success of this hospital is due to the effort and dedication of this Sister in Charge. The hospital also provides not only Outpatient Care (daily, hundreds of patients seek treatment), but also radiology, lab analysis and a pharmacy.My nominee is the Sister in Charge, has established many life saving programs, some listed below, that focus on a variety of healthcare issues: Well Baby Clinic: nominee organized well baby clinics, a total of 16 centers in the area.. On Tuesdays and Thursdays a registered nurse and, an assistants travel to different villages to check for a number of medically related issues. They check babies for health and normal growth as well as the health of adults. Age appropriate vaccinations are given including DPT, measles, hepatitis B, influenza, polio, and BCG.  In addition, birth control pills are provided for the mothers. If any children or adults are found to be critically ill, they are taken back to the hospital. For those children that appear undernourished, advice is given to the parents such as going to the hospital for care.HIV Clinic: nominee developed a home health program for the prevention and treatment of HIV. Every Tuesday and Friday afternoons, she visits two to three HIV patients supplying food, psychological, physiological and spiritual care for the entire village in which HIV patients are found. She treats HIV symptoms with appropriate medications. Over a period of 15 years, she has diagnosed over 10,000 patients with HIV (100 patients a year). Fifty HIV patients are on the books at all times .Prenatal Care: My nominee developed a prenatal care program at the mission to care for pregnant women every Wednesday.  nominee started a program of tetanus toxoid immunizations as a part of prenatal care that eliminated neonatal tetanus commonly found in newborns in the area before this program was started.  Pregnant women are also given a choice of being tested for HIV infection.

How do you know the nominee?
I have known my nominee since 1972 in Zimbabwe when were both teenagers.  She had finished a semester at Santa Rosa Junior College and didn't really know what her major would be.  Her mom had a great idea for her.  The secretary to the Missionary Doctor in the mission hospital was looking for someone to replace her for one year while she came back to the USA on furlough.  nominee's mom thought it would be a great idea for her to go and spend one year in Zimbabwe and be a secretary to the missionary Doctor who was also American and they supported  her for the year.  nominee took this offer from her parents and packed her bags and left for Zimbabwe when she was 17 years old and celebrated her 18th birthday in her new country. I am Zimbabwean and met my nominee in 1972 after I had finished High School.  My brother was principal of the mission school and he had arranged for me to come to the mission after getting my high school results so that we could plan my future.Both nominee and I were trying to figure out what we were going to do with our lives but it didn't take my nominee long to make her decision.  She fell in love with the people of Zimbabwe and got her call to become a nurse, then come back to help the people of Zimbabwe.

Why should this nominee win?
For over 28 years, she has committed her lifework to ease other peoples burdens by providing quality medical care and health education.  .  Her patient population is 100,000 but in reality should be 12.5 million since her hospital seem to be the only hospital working in the country at the present time.  In Out Patient, they see over 200 patients a day most of them coming from as far as Harare the capital city .nominee speaks the native Shona language, has provided numerous jobs for the Zimbabweans, and arranged waiting houses for mothers who have traveled long distance on foot to reach the hospital.  She is a noted speaker on the AIDS epidemic in Africa, and has implemented home care treatment for AIDS patients so they get treated in their villages.  Her tireless fund raising has resulted in a new maternity ward, a medical lab, and an AIDS  education center.  She has raised a scholarship fund for girls to go to school and right now she has 250 girls, and 15 boys in her program. Some of these girls end up being nurses or teachers in the area. Thus she has demonstrated what a nurse can do in a poverty stricken part of the world that is suffering from an AIDS epidemic.My favorite example of my nominees compassion and commitment to supporting someone in need is the story about two brothers Kudakwashe and Nicodemus: Both of these brothers were born with HIV.  Their father died shortly after the birth of Nicodemus in 1996.  In 1998 their mother died.  They went to live with their elderly grandmother who took care of them.  Their grandmother was a rural farmer who grew enough food to maintain the family, if there were good rains for the year.  In 2003 Kudakwashe who was 12 years old was admitted to the hospital by my nominee who quickly diagnosed him with TB and AIDS.  The grandmother and Kudakwashe had walked 25 miles to get care at the hospital.  Over the next several months my nominee continued to treat Kudakwashe, provide supplementary protein foods for the family to help the grandmother care for him and she sought a sponsor in order to start him on Anti-retroviral drugs.  Monthly he walked the 25 miles to get his medicine and slowly he became better.  While he continued to get better, his younger brother came in and also was now in full blown AIDS.  In 2006 he was started on antiretrovirals and has greatly improved.  The grandmother who thought she would bury her 2 grandchildren just like their parents is now very happy to see the children thriving and growing while taking their meds.  My nominee has paid for school fees, uniforms, and books for both of them.  She has showed concern for their physical well being as well as providing a way for them to take care of themselves in the future through education.

What has this nominee contributed to nursing?
How has the nominee contributed to the nursing profession in general My nominee has taken the opportunity of demonstrating her high level of competency in the profession of her choice by serving in another country that is poverty stricken. She is well known as a nurse throughout Zimbabwe. Her development of home health care programs is now widely used throughout Zimbabwe as well as neighboring countries. She has worked for many years with limited to no resources providing medical care. She has also worked at times as much as a year without a medical doctor available.

Is there anything else the judges should know?
What else should the judges know After the June 5th, 2006 edition of Nurse Week publication, she has had a number of visitors including nurses, doctors, pre-meds and others interested in the work she has accomplished. She provided accommodations, transportation, and meals for all who came and some are looking forward to returning. She has made an impact on those nurses who visited her from her home town, who are now working tirelessly, collecting medical supplies from different donors as well as raising monies for shipping those supplies to Zimbabwe. Personally, she has touched my life and I am now proud to be a nurse.  She is the one who encouraged and supported me to obtain my goals.   Many lives in Zimbabwe have been improved and will never be the same because of her!   She deserves to be honored and I am proud to nominate nominee for the Nurse Excellence Award.

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Sample Nomination – Management Category

Professional Role:
My nominee is the Nurse Manager for the Trauma, Emergency Department, and Bed Management in this _______-bed tertiary, non-profit, acute care, teaching community hospital. She manages one of the largest emergency departments in__________. She has administrative and clinical responsibilities of 160 FTEs with operating budget of 10 million. She is accountable for the leadership, strategic planning and team building for a management team of nine coordinators. As the manager of Bed Management, she oversees assignment of _____ inpatient beds. In addition to the ED daily operations (75,000 yearly visits), she is also responsible for the maintenance of the Trauma Service, Injury Prevention, Brain Injury, and Work Medicine Programs.

How do you know the nominee?
I know the nominee since _____________when I came to work in this hospital. In my capacity as the Shared Governance and Magnet Nurse Manager, I observed her departments’ nursing excellence led by her leadership and management.

Why should this person win?
This nominee should be selected for her leadership in the following accomplishments:-Achieved top 10 in USA for MI and pneumonia quality initiatives. Achieved Press Ganey scores over 90 in ED visits for the last 5 years. In_____________ the Emergency Medical Associates awarded her for her role as the original faculty member, for her outstanding team leadership, dedication in excellence in patient care and strong commitment to customer satisfaction. This hospital’s Board of Trustees Customer Satisfaction Committee also presented her an award on ______________for outstanding achievement in improving patient satisfaction. She successfully led two ED expansions and was responsible for the design and planning of additional 36 ED beds. -Led five successful trauma site surveys by the American College of Surgeons with emphasis on patient/family-centered care. We’ve become a preferred ED from pre-hospital providers who attest to our organizations delivery of good care, and we’ve been recognized by the American Trauma Society for her role in the planning and design of the Trauma Coordinator Core Course. Edited Trauma Coordinator Advanced Course through the American Trauma Society. ED Manager means more today in the emergency environment than just a numbers cruncher. ED Management role is one of negotiations, support, facilitation, and encouragement of staff. In the stress of everyday operations, overcrowding, and staffing shortages, this manager fought to keep staff and processes aligned with ENA and to facilitate her staff to participate in _____ENA and ENA on a multitude of levels. She supported nursing empowerment and autonomy thru the EDs staffing and self-scheduling. She fostered staff growth and development.  She made sure available resources are accessible to the staff.  She supported one of her ED staff leaders to launch an ED website which accorded her staff ease of navigation to the ENA and other emergency care sites, sites on overcrowding patient flow, disaster preparedness and disaster dare, stroke care, cardiac care, critical care, pediatric care, evidence-based practice resources, research websites, national information and databases, trauma care and psychiatric care. She supported staff efforts in starting research. She performed studies with her staff on The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Perception of Violence in ED Nurses,  Medication Reconciliation Practices in Emergency Departments, initiative for patients in ED prone to pressure ulcers by using mattress overlap, etc. She supported their efforts to present posters in national conferences. This manager found success in her goals to develop ED/trauma nurses through the ED Fellowship Program with her educators and advance nurse practitioners. She also hired nursing students in secretarial and technical positions to expose them to their chosen fields. They worked in the department and grew also professionally within.

Contributions to nursing in general:
My nominee is a member of the Emergency Nurses Association (since 1993), Society of Trauma Nurses (from 1991), American Trauma Society (from 1990), and Organization of Nurse Executives (from 2002). Her ENA involvement focused more on the support of staff development and leadership in the state ENA as well as at the national level. She contributed to the growth of trauma providers in their practice. As previously stated, she played an active role in the planning and design of the Trauma Coordinator Core Course. She edited the Trauma Coordinator Advanced Course through the American Trauma Society. Within the ED, she supported professionally and financially three of her staff who are members of national committees: Resolutions, Clinical Practice; and the chair of the Psychiatric Workgroup. Through her efforts and support, staff has taken on multiple positions at the state level: trauma chair, treasurer, informatics chair, program chair, marketing chair, exhibits committee, president elect, and research and practice. She also has six TNCC/ENPC instructors among her staff, two of which hold faculty status. She also provides a tremendous amount of financial support to the professional development to all levels of staff. TNCC and ENPC are supported as the standard and not the exception here at_______________. Considering that we have a nursing staff of 112 employees this is financially difficult both with costs involved and scheduling necessary for the educational time. Further, staff has been encouraged to take the instructor classes and even faculty classes to better themselves and help further her vision. Nursing development is supported by encouraging certification in the form of CEN. She has supported on-site CEN reviews twice in the last 3 years from outside lecturers. ED staffs who achieve their CEN are awarded a pin and have their name added to the plaque, which is displayed prominently in the department. All staff during evaluations that do not have their CEN is asked to incorporate the certification in their goals for the upcoming year.

What else should the judges know?
In____________, the Trauma  Injury Prevention Service of this hospital celebrated 10 years of Injury Prevention Programming as __________Safe Kids / Safe Communities. Our Safe Community Concept was established in _________ when my nominee was the Trauma Nurse Coordinator. Her vision, energy and understanding of the need for prevention in trauma care made a difference. Under the guidance of this nurse manager, the ED staff initiated their programming in _________County. By 2000 it had expanded to__________ and ________ Counties to match our trauma catchments area. The need for additional program enabled us to become a Local Safe Kids Coalition as well. Her strong community ties with the pre-hospital care providers and first responders enabled us to build a strong coalition foundation. She emphasized the theoretical framework for our Injury Prevention Program as outlined by National Highway Traffic Safety.  All partners participate as equals in developing solutions, sharing successes, assuming risks, and building a community structure and process to continue improvement of community life through the reduction of injuries and costs. This manager saw the need to involve the medical, acute care and rehabilitation, first responders, law enforcement, civic groups, corporate and manufacturing business and our government agencies within our coalition. She recognized the need to be actively engaged as integral partners in preventing injuries. As her role with the administration of Trauma  Injury Prevention changed, her support became stronger. We have been able to keep a clear concept of our goals and mission under her guidance: to reduce fatalities, injuries and property damage due to unintentional injuries on the road, at home and at play. Beyond the support of personnel and funding for the injury prevention programs, my nominee has supported legislative changes in _____that have made_________ a safer state: Our Very STRONG CPS Law, established in _____________after the Safe Kids Report Card gave _________it an F as a very weak law; a tighter helmet law requiring kids up to 17 to wear a helmet on a bike, skateboard of skates; our .08 legislation that addresses drunk driving; our present work on the graduated drivers license and aggressive driving campaigns. These legislative / enforcement actions have raised awareness to make our communities safer. She has supported the efforts of Injury Prevention through tight fiscal and staffing times, major hospital mergers, administrative changes, and growth and expansion within the hospital system.

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Sample Nomination - Mentoring Category

Professional Role:
The title Associate Chief Nurse, Nursing Education, Research and Professional Development does not begin to describe the depth and breadth of her role. Directly responsible for 12.6 Central Clinical Educators, a doctorally prepared Nurse Research Scientist, and 2 doctorally prepared Nurse Research Consultants, she also shares responsibility for 25 unit based clinical educators. Over 1,200 RNs depend on her leadership and guidance every day for educational and professional development activities. In her role as Associate Chief Nurse, the nominee has led in the development of the Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice program at this organization and is also co-leading the quest for Magnet recognition. She is responsible for developing innovative educational initiatives for the organization and provides coordination for continuing education, clinical affiliations and placements, leadership development and career advancement. The nominee represents our nursing department on hospital wide committees and participates in community, state, national organizations, and professional activities concerned with nursing. She develops strategies for nursing research and for the collaborative advancement of all organizational colleagues, overseeing partnerships with a variety of academic institutions. The nominee is knowledgeable in state of the art technology and is responsible for establishing the new position and role of our Nursing Education Technology Educator. She is an expert in program and curriculum development, and is an experienced nurse leader.

How do you know the nominee?
I have had the pleasure to work with the nominee professionally for over 5 years. As the Senior Education Coordinator, I report directly to the nominee and assume responsibility for the Central Education Department in her absence. She has been a motivational force in my life during this time and has provided mentorship, direction, and inspiration for me and for many of our colleagues. If I had to give a short definition of the term professional nurse and mentor, I would submit this nominees name. In all aspects of her practice, she is an advocate for quality patient care through education and research and to achieve this, she conducts her professional life according to the highest principles. I believe that I have benefited greatly from her mentorship and have grown in my role as a nursing leader and educator. Because of her encouragement, I returned to school to obtain my Masters degree in nursing, which had not previously been an academic goal. At a point when I was comfortable and settled in my career, the nominee challenged and inspired me to reach higher. She demonstrated, with her characteristic energy and zeal, that learning is truly a life long endeavor. As a nursing leader, I have had the good fortune to have the nominee as my mentor, constantly guiding, counseling and teaching me. Although older then the nominee, I constantly look up to her as a role model and as a trusted coach. Over the years, she has opened up the doors of opportunity for me, enabling me to embrace challenge that led to professional development and greatly enhanced professional satisfaction. I would like to think that I had monopoly on the nominee as a mentor, but beyond myself, she has mentored many members of the nursing staff. Always finding or making time to counsel anyone who asks, she helps each individual to explore future career and educational possibilities. She consistently extends herself, providing whatever resources are appropriate and continues her mentoring relationship throughout the career of each person.

Why should this person win?
This nominee is distinguished as a mentor by the level of her personal commitment of time and energy to help others. She accepts others as they are, drawing on each persons strengths. Taking care to learn the needs, ambitions and talents of those she mentors, the nominee never hesitates to research the best avenue for their professional success. Through the ups and downs of the professional development process, she provides a steady, encouraging and knowledgeable presence. In her tenure as Associate Chief Nurse, the nominees accomplishments have affected every facet of the nursing department. A clinical educator noted in a message to the Chief Nursing Officer that the nominee, has orchestrated some pretty fantastic things for nurses and nursing professional development. Some of those include the establishment of clinical Pathways to Expertise in a variety of specialty practice areas, the initiation and implementation of formal nursing research and evidenced based practice program, monthly staff presentations of Nursing Grand Rounds, the facilitation of over 135 educational programs for nurses at all levels, and outreach to universities and colleges resulting in a myriad of undergraduate and graduate academic relationships. To date, one of the crowning achievements for the nominee is the establishment of the Center for Clinical and Professional Development at our health care organization. As the leader of nursing education here, the nominee used this enormous project as a tool to unify a disparate group of educators into a solid and coherent team. The Center now houses our state of the art Simulation Lab, several media equipped classrooms, and a computer lab, all of which are utilized by instructors and students within and outside the organization. The nominee credits her team with this great success, which is itself the height of mentoring.

Contributions to nursing in general:
This nominee has contributed significantly to the profession of nursing, to her organization and to so many individuals that it is difficult to enumerate. To begin, in her 32 years as a professional nurse, she has held a variety of nursing leadership positions in both the practice and academic arenas. As an assistant visiting professor in the graduate nursing program at Regis College, her influence as a teacher in the classroom and clinical setting cannot be understated. She taught by example, modeling high standards of patient care, compassion for others, respect for all and lifelong learning, attributes which remain an essential component of her mentoring style. Each and every nurse who has been touched by this nominees love of nursing, enthusiasm and boundless energy has become a nurse rededicated to excellence in patient care, and the advancement of the nursing profession. Contributions to nursing in general include the nominees active membership in professional organizations such as MONE that expand her sphere of influence into the public sector. As former chair of the MONE Government Affairs Committee, she has testified at the state legislature regarding pending nursing legislation. Traveling into the State House on several occasions, she has mentored other nurses through their initial exposure to the workings of state government. She also facilitated an all day educational program, Advocacy in Action, to encourage nurses at all levels to participate in furthering nursings voice in governmental affairs. The nominee has been appointed to the Co-chairmanship of the Massachusetts Nursing Initiatives Nurse of the Future Competency Committee. As Co-chair, she actively collaborated with the Committee to develop the competency criteria necessary to the success of the nurse of tomorrow.The research activities of the nominee have included Interdisciplinary Education, in collaboration with Tufts University, which focused on the teaching contributions of nursing with 2nd year medical students. She has also shared her research studies on Delegation and Critical Thinking and on Delegation and Missed Routine Nursing Care with her colleagues through poster and podium presentations and publications. The Journal of Nursing Administration has accepted her work for publication in March 2009. She will be conducting poster presentations at the annual American Organization of Nurse Executives conference as well as at the Eastern Nursing Research Society in 2009. The nominee is committed to the role as a mentor and dedicated to the growth and development of others. In this role, the nominee gives back to her profession, for those currently in the profession as well as for those who will enter nursing in the future. It is a rare individual of whom one can truly say, Nursing is better today because of her contributions.

What else should the judges know?
In my 36 years as a full time professional nurse, I have never known anyone as dedicated and committed to professional nursing as the nominee. She has an enthusiasm for all areas of professional practice and this enthusiasm is contagious. She has inspired many colleagues to pursue professional as well as personal goals, and has worked tirelessly to provide guidance and encouragement to members of the Nursing Department. From the professional to those thinking about entering nursing, the nominee expends tremendous energy in serving as a guide, a motivator, a facilitator and a role model. It is hard to nominate her in just one category, as her leadership in nursing encompasses solid management skills, superb teaching ability, dedication to advancing and leading the profession of nursing and of course mentoring. The nominee encounters significant numbers of staff on a daily basis, but yet manages to impart a caring attitude for each individual, an attitude that is backed by her endeavors, respecting each person and motivating them to aspire to their highest level of achievement. She possesses important characteristics such as a sense of humor and a down to earth attitude, characteristics which help her stay on an even keel under times of stress and which make her approachable to staff of all levels. She is quick to recognize the achievements of others, thus empowering them to greater heights. As a seasoned professional, she is quick to realize that no one is perfect and accepts that we are all works in progress. It is rare to have the privilege of working with a mentor who cares so much about those she mentors, who is not afraid to admit when she doesnt have a clear understanding of something, who can laugh along with others, sharing in their success, yet understanding when obstacles occur. It is then that her abilities as a mentor shine. Professionalism, intelligence, commitment, respect, caring, and teamwork are words that one would use to describe this nominee.

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Sample Nomination - Teaching Category

Professional Role:
The nominee is a Senior Nurse Scientist at a large academic medical center in Boston. She has been in this role since 1988.  In addition, the nominee is a Professor in the School of Nursing at a Boston area College.

How do you know the nominee?
I have known the nominee since 1989 when I first started working at a large academic medical center in Boston.  Over the years, 1989-present, I have worked collaboratively with the nominee and other members of our executive team to design, implement and evaluate some of the cornerstones of the professional practice model at our institution, including, but not limited to: collaborative governance model, the professional practice environment survey, and the nursing research strategic plan.

Why should this person win?
I can think of no better person to receive the Nursing Spectrum/Nurseweek Excellence Award for Teaching.  The nominee embodies the role of the teacher.  John Quincy Adams once said, "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader." The nominee lives those words.  She is fully committed to her students' growth.  She selflessly gives of her time and knowledge to further each student's development and is always focused on the other rather than herself.  It is not unusual for her to be at her desk until midnight reviewing and editing work that students and nurses have asked her advice on.  She makes time for anyone and everyone who needs her help. The nominee is a teacher in every setting - both in the classroom and in clinical practice.  Her philosophy is that the human person is a whole and her work reflects the unity of theory, research and practice to advance the nursing profession by educating nurses in the use of nursing science to improve patient care and the human condition. Not only is the candidate a brilliant thinker and teacher but she is also a truly kind and generous person who works endlessly to support students and staff.  She has a unique combination of being both challenging and nurturing so that the nurse or student advances in knowledge but in a way that feels fully supported.  Her teaching style is informed by her calling as a nurse. The candidate is not only a master of nursing knowledge, she is a leader because she is able to use that knowledge to inspire and drive others.  It would be easy to be intimidated by someone with her credentials and accomplishments but instead she fosters and encourages new ideas, full disclosure and "challenging the status quo." The nominee has a way of single-handedly motivating every nurse she meets to advance their thinking, practice and education.  As a result of meeting her, many staff nurses and advanced practice nurses have continued their education and returned to practice influencing and supporting a professional model, improving patient care, and "giving nursing a voice." The nominee is able to connect with nurses at every level and is able to ignite their potential. Through the process of her mentorship, nurses in our facility learn to articulate the essence of nursing and how as a nurse they distinctively contribute to the patient experience.  At our institution, there are nearly two dozen nurses with doctorates in nursing - an astounding figure. The nominee formed the Doctoral Forum which advances the work and impact of these nurses through research, the creation of centers of excellence (e.g. Wound Center) and publications. The nominee has also influenced the refinement of a survey tool for staff nurses to identify and rank common nursing practice problems seen in the clinical arena.  Within this survey tool, nurses are asked what support they are given in regard to these clinical problems. This has generated a greater understanding of the needs of nurses at the bedside.  In addition, the findings of this survey have greatly impacted the role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist at our institution and nationally. In fact, the common patient problems survey was presented and administered to CNSs at the annual meeting of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. In addition, I have witnessed first hand the exquisite work that the nominee has done to develop, implement, and most importantly, evaluate the impact of our collaborative governance model - the eight committee communication and decision-making structure. Through her leadership and coaching, the committee leaders and membership are poised to sift through the complex issues that face today's health care clinicians. Together, the committees are adept at getting to the heart of the matter and display the qualities of creativity, collaboration, critical analysis, organization, and purposeful persistence. I am in awe of the programs and initiatives that have originated out of the collaborative governance committees and because of the nominee's influence, our institution sets the gold standard for collaborative decision-making  Many of the outcomes from these committees drove the development of our written evidence for our Magnet application in 2003 and is driving the writing for our current Magnet redesignation application effort.

Contributions to nursing in general:
The nominee has been a nurse for over 40 years, 27 of those as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing.  She has held national office as the President of NANDA and the Eastern Nursing Research Society (ENRS), to name just a few. She has influenced hundreds of nurses as a graduate faculty member and as a senior nurse scientist has influenced and guided the development of the professional practice environment, developed measures and conducted outcomes research, and mentored hundreds of nurses at all levels. She is a fierce advocate for nursing.  What makes her truly amazing is her ability to articulate nursing's unique disciplinary contributions to care found within the nurse/patient-family partnerships. She is a strong voice for the profession of nursing as evidenced by the recent book she co-authored titled, "Giving Voice to What We Know: Margaret Newman's Theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness in Nursing Practice, Research and Education." The nominee possesses an unwavering commitment to advancing the domain of nursing and collaborative practice and an openness to do whatever it takes to make care delivery the best it can be.  She exemplifies the very best in what it means to be a nurse leader, mentor and teacher.

What else should the judges know?
It doesn't matter who you ask the question, "What is unique about the nominee?", the answer is always the same. The answer is, "The nominee makes me feel like I'm the most most important person when I talk to her -  she is genuinely interested in what I have to say and intently listens to me."  There is a difference between an instructor and a teacher.  An instructor is someone with intellectual prowess who shares information only, with a student.  A teacher, on the other hand. uses intellectual prowess to nurture the intellect and develop the personhood of a student.  A teacher is personal, and the nominee is very much a teacher.    Always the teacher, she says to all of us.  "Have you thought of it this way?", "You need to publish this paper", and "This is a presentation." And, with her encouragement, we do.

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