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The CDC releases updated PPE guidelines for healthcare workers
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidelines Oct. 20, tightening its previous infection control guidance for healthcare workers caring for patients with Ebola. The guidelines also address concerns about what constitutes proper personal protective equipment for healthcare workers and the correct way to don and doff PPE, among other protocols. The guidance is centered on the following three...READ MORE »
Study: PT before joint replacement can reduce postop care
Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery can reduce the need for postoperative care by nearly 30%, saving an average of $1,215 per patient in skilled nursing facility, home health agency or other postop care, according to a new study. An estimated 52.5 million U.S. adults have physician-diagnosed arthritis, according to the CDC, and patients often need THR or TKR to maintain mobility as the condition...READ MORE »
ANA calls on the CDC for clear safety guidelines to avoid Ebola transmissions
In a call Oct. 16 with nurses across the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced revised emergency preparedness and treatment guidelines to prevent transmissions of Ebola in the U.S., according to a news release. The changes come after two nurses from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas became infected with Ebola while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, who died from the disease on...READ MORE »
VA initiatives reduce staph infections in veterans
A Department of Veterans Affairs initiative targeting staph infections in hospitalized patients has produced positive results, according to data released by the VA. Among VA patients in ICUs between 2007 and 2012, healthcare-associated MRSA infection rates dropped 72% - from 1.64 to 0.46 per 1,000 patient days. Infection rates dropped 66% - from 0.47 to 0.16 per 1,000 patient days - for patients treated in non-ICU...READ MORE »
CDC: Nurse not to blame for breach of protocols in Ebola infection
The Texas nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a patient with the disease and the healthcare facility where she worked should not be blamed for improperly following guidelines to contain the virus, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, said in a press conference Monday. Frieden clarified remarks he made the day before when he spoke of "a breach in protocol" that allowed the...READ MORE »
First on the scene: Emory University Hospital nurses discuss their care of Ebola patients
This summer, Carolyn Hill, MSN, RN-BC, and 20 other nurses at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta were among the first nurses to treat patients with the Ebola virus in the U.S. "Most of the nurses who stayed in the room [with a patient] can say it was an emotional journey," said Hill, nursing unit director of the serious communicable disease unit at Emory. "They knew what to do clinically, but you can get very...READ MORE »
The Next Shift: Long story short
We asked our experienced readers to share the wisdom they have gained from their own careers to help guide the next generation of nurses, and we're excited by the response we're getting. Here, we feature quick contributions from four nurses. Keep the stories coming! They may be featured in Nurse.com magazine, on our website or in a special collection in 2015. Share your story at Nurse.com/Next-Shift. Over the years,...READ MORE »
Bare necessities
When Donna Gallagher, MS, MA, APRN-C, ANP, FAAN, co-director of the Office of Global Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Boston, was helping train nurses in Liberia, she collected sterile medical equipment - gloves, masks, gowns - from hospitals and home care agencies, packed it into duffel bags and brought it with her to Monrovia, the country's capital. When she opened the bags for the...READ MORE »
Safe travels: Responding to the Ebola crisis overseas
As the Ebola crisis in West Africa escalates, with rising rates of virus transmission and deaths, global organizations are crying out for a worldwide response, including healthcare workers willing to help care for people who have the hemorrhagic disease. But getting to one of the three countries hardest hit - Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea - to work in an Ebola treatment center is not a matter of getting on a...READ MORE »
Wanted: Nurses for fight against Ebola
Putting on and taking off a biohazard suit - the protective armor in the battle against Ebola - is no simple task, as Audrey Rangel, MIPH, RN, learned during 10 days of intensive training at a hospital in Liberia. A coworker must be present to make sure the suit is not damaged or improperly donned or removed. There are inner gloves, outer gloves, a gown, an apron, a mask and goggles. When removing the suits, workers...READ MORE »
Ebola in the U.S.
What is the best way for nurses to make sure they are prepared to deal with a possible case of Ebola virus in their healthcare organizations? Stay informed and ask lots of questions, said nurses who work in infectious disease control. "The more questions we get and the more people look at the protocols and policies and ask for training, I think the more prepared we can be," said Linda Greene, RN, MPS, CIC, an...READ MORE »
Ebola in the U.S.
What is the best way for nurses to make sure they are prepared to deal with a possible case of Ebola virus in their healthcare organizations? Stay informed and ask lots of questions, said nurses who work in infectious disease control. "The more questions we get and the more people look at the protocols and policies and ask for training, I think the more prepared we can be," said Linda Greene, RN, MPS, CIC, an...READ MORE »
Article sheds light on Ebola healthcare workers' high fatality rate
An Oct. 3 TIME article discusses the high death rate for local healthcare workers in West Africa who are treating patients infected with the Ebola virus disease. According to the article, the high rate may be due, in part, to a lack of resources that prevent African healthcare workers - who form the bulk of the Ebola aid teams in the region - from being evacuated to Europe or the U.S. for treatment. This is in...READ MORE »
RWJF study: More BSN nurses lowers mortality rates, care costs
A new interdisciplinary study, published in the current issue of Medical Care and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative, finds that increasing the proportion of BSN-prepared nurses in a hospital to 80% or more - as suggested by the Institute of Medicine report, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health" - and having those nurses interact...READ MORE »
Study: 76.3% of older adults don't get enough strength training
Middle-age and older adults fell short, with 76.3% not meeting recommendations for regular participation in muscle-strengthening exercises, according to a study published by the CDC. Evidence has shown strength training for these age groups can help to promote health, functional fitness and functional independence. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends adults perform muscle strengthening...READ MORE »